The Praglia Abbey

In this chapter we discuss an important building in the Paduan countryside, the Praglia Abbey, a Benedictine monastery located in the Euganean Hills.

The Praglia Abbey is a Benedictine monastery located in the municipality of Teolo in the Paduan countryside at the foot of Mount Lonzina, on the Euganean Hills. This ancient monastery was founded in the 11th century by the Maltraversi family from Vicenza, for the Benedictine order, known at the time as "Pratalia", only the bell tower remains of the original medieval building. The large abbey complex in late Gothic style, is divided into four particular cloisters communicating with each other.

The Praglia Abbey

Entering we find the botanical cloister, where once medicinal plants are cultivated, now it looks like a pretty garden. The hanging cloister, located on the first floor and supported by four large columns, is surrounded by the most representative rooms of the monastery, such as the refectory, the chapter house, the belvedere loggia, the library and the church. The rustic cloister, once used for agricultural work, today delimits the space for hospitality, a very important reality for the whole Benedictine order. Finally, the double cloister where the monks rested.

The Praglia Abbey

Inside the Praglia Abbey we also find two other suggestive environments, namely: the monumental Refettorio, with a magnificent wooden furniture in walnut and briar and a vast fresco of the Crucifixion, painted by Bartolomeo Montagna in about 1490 and the National Monumental Library, which contains about 100,000 volumes, a place of conservation and transmission of culture, where the monks can find everything they need for theological, spiritual and cultural formation.
The church dedicated to the Blessed Virgin Mary of the Assumption is the heart of the whole monastery and of community life. The building is in the shape of a Latin cross with three naves, built on a design by Tullio Lombardo around 1490-1550, inside we find works by Venetian painters of the XVI - XVII centuries.
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